EKAW 2010 Workshop on Ontology Quality


15th October 2010 - Lisbon, Portugal


Motivation and Objectives

In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the development and application of ontologies. Consequently, many research groups have produced many ontologies in both collaborative and independent efforts. The development of application ontologies, for example, usually requires the reuse of different ontologies, so bits from different ontologies have to be combined. For this purpose, developers have to decide which ontology to use for their particular purposes, but they lack support for making an informed decision. Given the different backgrounds of the ontology builders, ontologies with different structure and content are produced, making it harder to choose for users and developers alike. Such decision would certainly benefit from the assessment of the quality of those candidate ontologies.

Ensuring the quality of the ontologies built and the processes used for its design and implementation would certainly contribute to higher quality semantic systems and to the success of the Semantic Web, and to move ontology engineering towards an engineering field.

Addressing quality in Engineering means to address a series of different aspects ranging from the construction process to the final product.  Recently, for example, the success of social networks is converting social aspects of ontology building and use in to a new quality indicator.

The process of building ontologies has traditionally been an art rather than an engineering process, despite the existence of methodologies for supporting this process. The correct application of methodologies already help guarantee some quality in the resulting ontology, although the quality offered by such methodologies has not,  so far, been measured quantitative or qualitatively.  There are no maturity models for the ontology building processes that might be used for this purpose.  On the other hand, ontology design patterns play an important role in obtaining higher quality ontologies. In the last years, some international efforts have been put on defining such patterns for generic ontology building or oriented to particular domains, so knowing the best and worst practices would also contribute to get better ontologies.

The objective of this workshop is to serve as a forum for sharing the most recent efforts and experiences in this area, disseminating the current best practices and discussing the directions that the field should take. Therefore, this workshop is oriented to any researcher or practitioner working or interested in the following areas:
-    reusing ontologies with informed decisions
-    methods and tools for evaluating the technical quality of ontologies
-    methods and tools for evaluating the quality of the content of ontologies
-    methods and tools for improving ontology construction processes
-    methods and tools for adapting and applying quality standards from other engineering fields to ontology evaluation
-    relevant dimensions of quality for domain and high-level ontologies in specific domains
-    methods and tools for evaluating the practical and social success of ontologies
-    best (and worst) practices in ontology building
-    improving the quality of ontologies through design patterns
-    experiences of quality evaluation in specific domains

Chairs

Nathalie Aussenac-Gilles
IRIT, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France
email
   
Jesualdo Tomas  Fernandez-Breis
Facultad de Informática, Universidad de Murcia, CP 30100, Murcia, Spain
email

Robert Stevens   
School of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
email

PC members


Mauricio Almeida (Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil)
Christopher Brewster (Aston Business School, UK)
Mathieu D'Aquin (Open University, UK)
Sylvie Despres (Université Paris-Nord, France)
Michel Dumontier (Carleton University, Canada)
Nicola Guarino (ISTC-CNR Laboratory for Applied Ontology, Trento, Italy)
Nathalie Hernandez (IRIT, France)
Phil Lord (Newcastle University, UK)
Mari Carmen Suarez Figueroa (Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain)
Rafael Valencia (University of Murcia, Spain)
York Sure (University of Koblenz-Landau, GESIS, Germany)
Karin Verspoor (University of Denver, USA)
Johanna  Völker (University of Mannheim, Germany)

Contributions

Paper submission and reviewing for this workshop will be electronic via EasyChair . The papers should be written in English, follow Springer LNCS format, and be submitted in PDF.
Two types of submissions are accepted in this workshop:
-    short papers: up to 6 pages
-    regular papers: up to 12 pages

Proceedings will be distributed to the participants during the workshop, and made available as CEUR proceedings after the workshop.

Important Dates

Submission: June 30th July 5th
Notification: July, 25th
Camera-ready deadline: September, 1st